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I'm thinking about going self-employed. How do I go about starting my own company?

Leaving full-time employment and the comfort of a steady job and salary is no easy decision. But, if you're contemplating the prospect of starting your own venture and company then check out our legal guide about business law as it may help you with your initial thinking :  http://www.lawplainandsimple.com/legal-guides/article/making-sense-of-business-law

I'm thinking of buying my first house. Do I need to hire a solicitor?

Not necessarily but it is highly advisable. Take a look at our legal guide about conveyancing here: http://www.lawplainandsimple.com/legal-guides/area/conveyancing

I can't pay my bills or debts. I'm broke. Does that mean I'm Bankrupt?

It might. We recommend you read our legal guide about bankruptcy and then take qualified legal advice in relation to your unique circumstance:  http://www.lawplainandsimple.com/legal-guides/area/bankruptcy

I've come up with a brilliant idea. How do I stop someone from stealing it?

Well, it will depend what your brilliant idea is and who, what, where, when, why and how you aim to protect and exploit it. Perhaps start by looking at our legal guide on Intellectual Property Law (IP) and the sections on the four main IP law areas :  http://www.lawplainandsimple.com/legal-guides/article/understanding-intellectual-property-law

I have just remarried – do I need to update my Will?

The simple answer is yes. There are a number of significant events in a persons life when it is suggested that you either create a Will or update your existing Will, including getting remarried and having children. We recommend that you start off by reading our guide on what a Will is. http://www.lawplainandsimple.com/legal-guides/article/what-is-a-will

I feel I have received poor treatment from a doctor but don't know what I can do about it?

Undergoing treatment for any illness can be a stressful time, not just for the patient but for the patients family as well. Feeling that you have been poorly treated can only add to that stress. If you feel you have been mistreated please take a look at our guide outlining what constitutes clinical negligence and on what grounds you can make a claim. http://www.lawplainandsimple.com/legal-guides/article/what-is-clinical-negligence-and-do-i-have-a-claim

What Is The Difference Between A Solicitor & A Public Notary

In the UK people in general do not understand what the distinction is between a Public Notary and a Solicitor. Isabel Figueiredo at Goughs Solicitors, Calne explains.

A Notary is a qualified lawyer and a member of the third and oldest branch of the legal profession in the UK. Notaries are appointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury and are regulated by the Court of Faculties. 

One would ask so what is the difference between a solicitor and a Notary? A Notary’s functions are mostly concerned with the authentication and certification of signatures and documents to be used abroad. As such people when asked to sign powers of attorney, oaths of executors, documents relating to sales of property abroad, immigration documents and company and business documents and transactions all to be used abroad they would require a Notary and not a Solicitor. 

A Notary’s duty is to the transaction and not to the actual client. As a Notary the receiving jurisdiction relies on the Notary’s signature, seal and stamp to validate the document. So in essence, what a Notary does is actually help people who have issues to be resolved in foreign jurisdictions by allowing them to sign and execute certain documentation which will be accepted in that jurisdiction.

In many of the civil law jurisdictions you can either be a qualified lawyer or a Notary. Whereas in the UK you are permitted to be both and undertake work as a Notary and as a Solicitor.

Author

Isabel Figueiredo

Goughs Solicitors

http://www.goughs.co.uk/site/home/

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